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Geography

Our Geography Subject Leaders are Miss Russell and Mrs Gelder.

Geography at St. Joseph’s

At St. Joseph’s, we aim to fulfil the requirements of the National Curriculum for Geography by providing our pupils with an inspiring, broad and balanced curriculum. Our teaching equips pupils with knowledge about places and people; resources in the environment; physical and human processes; formation and use of landscapes. The children will also develop geographical skills; collecting and analysing data; using maps, globes, aerial photographs and digital mapping to name and identify countries, continents and oceans; and by communicating information in a variety of ways. We want the children to enjoy and develop a love of learning for geography by gaining knowledge and skills, not just through experiences in the classroom, but also with the use of fieldwork and educational visits.

 

Early Years Foundation Stage

Foundation Stage Geography is where the children begin to gain a wider experience of the world around them. Geography is taught in Nursery and Reception as an integral part of the topic work covered during the year. The children will learn through first-hand experiences to explore, observe, problem solve, predict, think critically, make decisions and talk about the people, creatures, objects and plants in their natural environments. To encourage the children to think and make connections between ideas, adults will ask the children open-ended questions about the things they observe and experience.

Key Stage One

During Years 1 and 2 children will begin to develop their geographical vocabulary by learning about where they live, as well as another part of the United Kingdom and a contrasting non-European country. Alongside this, the children will learn about weather patterns here in the United Kingdom and those in hot and cold areas of the world. Over Years 1 and 2, the children will learn to use ICT, world maps, atlases and globes, aerial photographs and plans, simple compass directions as well as simple fieldwork and observational skills.

Key Stage Two

In Years 3 to 6, the children build upon their previous knowledge and understanding. Learning about more areas of the United Kingdom and Europe and North and South America. Including the location and characteristics of a range of the world’s most significant human and physical featuresincluding; climate zones, rivers, mountains, volcanoes, earthquakes, water types, types of settlements, economic activity and the distribution of natural resources. Developing their use of geographical knowledge, understanding and skills, enhancing their locational and place knowledge.

Assessment

At St. Joseph’s, we follow a two-year rolling programme from the Commando Joe’s framework. Ongoing assessment of children’s work in Geography is made by informal judgements as we observe the children during lessons. Once the children complete a piece of work, it is marked and commented on. Teachers assess learning at the end of a topic, against the national curriculum requirements by highlighting the target tracker statements. We use this information to plan future work to ensure we are building upon the children’s current skills and knowledge.

Useful Online Links

 

 

Years 1 and 2

Years 3 and 4

Years 5 and 6

Geographical Fieldwork and Map Skills

  • Pupils should be taught to:
  1. use world maps, atlases and globes to identify the United Kingdom and its countries,as well as the countries, continents and oceans studied at this key stage
  2. use simple compass directions (North, South, East, West) and locational language [for example, near and far; left and right], to describe the location of features and routes on a map
  3. use aerial photographs and plan perspectives to recognise landmarks and basic human and physical features; devise a simple map; and use and construct basic symbols in a key
  4. use simple fieldwork and observational skills to study the geography of their school and its grounds and the key human and physical features of its surrounding environment
  • Pupils should be taught to:
  1. use maps, atlases, globes and digital/computer mapping to locate countries and describe features studied
  2. use the eight points of a compass, four and six-figure grid references, symbols and key (including the use of Ordnance Survey maps) to build their knowledge of the United Kingdom and the wider world
  3. use fieldwork to observe, measure, record and present the human and physical features in the local area using a range of methods, including sketch maps, plans and graphs, and digital technologies

Year 1

Year 2

Year 3

Year 4

Year 5

Year 6

  1. Use world maps, atlases and globes to identify the United Kingdom and its countries.
  2. Use simple fieldwork and observational skills to study the Geography of their school and its surrounding grounds and the key human and physical features of the surrounding environment
  1. Use aerial photographs and plan perspectives to recognise landmarks and basic human and physical features;
  2. Devise a simple map and use and construct basic symbols in a key
  3. Use simple compass directions (North, South, East, West) and locational and directional language (e.g. far, near, left, right) to describe the location of features and routes on a map
  1. Use maps, atlases, globes and digital/computer mapping (Google Earth) to locate countries and describe features studied
  2. Learn the eight points of a compass, 2 figure grid reference (maths coordinates), some basic symbols and key (including simplified Ordnance Survey Maps) to build their knowledge of the United Kingdom and the Wider World
  3. Use fieldwork to observe and record the human and physical features in the local area using a range of methods, including sketch maps, plans and graphs and digital technologies
  1. Use maps, atlases, globes and digital/computer mapping (Google Earth) to locate countries and describe features studied
  2. Consolidate understanding of the eight figure compass points
  3. Learn four figure grid references
  4. Use fieldwork to observe and record the human and physical features in the local area using a range of methods, including sketch maps, plans and graphs and digital technologies
  1. Use maps, atlases, globes and digital/computer mapping (Google Earth) to locate countries and describe features studied
  2. Use the eight points of a compass, four figure grid references, symbols and key (including Ordnance Survey maps) to build their knowledge of the United Kingdom past and present.
  3. Use fieldwork to observe, measure and record the human and physical features in the local area using a range of methods, including sketch maps, plans and graphs and digital technologies
  1. Use maps, atlases, globes and digital/computer mapping (Google Earth) to locate countries and describe features studied
  2. Extend to 6 figure grid references with teaching of latitude and longitude in depth
  3. Expand map skills to include non-UK countries
  4. Use fieldwork to observe, measure and record the human and physical features in the local area using a range of methods, including sketch maps, plans and graphs and digital technologies

 

Years 1 and 2

Years 3 and 4

Years 5 and 6

Locational Knowledge

  • Pupils should be taught to:
    1. name and locate the worlds seven continents and five oceans
    2. name, locate and identify characteristics of the four countries and capital cities of the United Kingdom and its surrounding seas
  • Pupils should be taught to:
  1. locate the worlds countries, using maps to focus on Europe (including the location of Russia) and North and South America, concentrating on their environmental regions, key physical and human characteristics, countries, and major cities
  2. name and locate counties and cities of the United Kingdom, geographical regions and their identifying human and physical characteristics, key topographical features (including hills, mountains, coasts and rivers), and land-use patterns; and understand how some of these aspects have changed over time
  3. identify the position and significance of latitude, longitude, Equator, Northern Hemisphere, Southern Hemisphere, the Tropics of Cancer and Capricorn, Arctic and Antarctic Circle, the Prime/ Greenwich Meridian and time zones (including day and night)

Year 1

Year 2

Year 3

Year 4

Year 5

Year 6

  1. Name, locate and identify characteristics of the four countries and capital cities of the United Kingdom and its surrounding seas
  1. Name and locate the world’s seven continents and five oceans
  1. Locate and name the continents on a World Map
  2. Locate the main countries of Europe and identify their capital cities
  3. Locate and name the countries making up the British Isles with their capital cities
  4. Identify longest rivers in the world, largest deserts, highest mountains and compare with the UK
  5. Identify the position and significance of the Equator, Northern and Southern Hemisphere, Tropics of Cancer and Capricorn
  1. On a World map, locate areas of similar environmental regions either desert, rainforest or temperate regions
  2. Locate and name the main counties and cities in/around Newcastle
  1. Locate the main countries in Europe and North and South America. Locate and name principle cities
  2. Compare 2 different regions in the UK rural/urban
  3. Linking with History, compare land use maps of the UK from the past and present
  4. Identify the position and significance of longitude/latitude and the Greenwich Meridian.  Linking with Science, time zones, night and day
  1. On a world map locate the main countries in Africa, Asia and Australasia/Oceania
  2. Identify their main environmental regions, key physical and human characteristics and major cities.
  3. Linking with History, map how land use has changed over time.
  4. Locate and name the key topographical features including coast, features of erosion, hills, mountains and rivers.
  5. Understand how these features have changed over time

 

Years 1 and 2

Years 3 and 4

Years 5 and 6

Place Knowledge

  • Pupils should be taught to:
  1. understand geographical similarities and differences through studying the human and physical geography of a small area of the UK, and a contrasting non-European country
  • Pupils should be taught to:
  1. understand geographical similarities and differences through the study of human and physical geography of a region of the United Kingdom, a region in a European country, and a region within North or South America

Year 1

Year 2

Year 3

Year 4

Year 5

Year 6

  1. Understand geographical similarities and differences through studying the human and physical geography of a small area in a contrasting non-European country using Barnaby Bear/class bear
  1. Understand geographical similarities and differences through studying the human and physical geography of an area of the United Kingdom and of a small area in a contrasting non-European locality concentrating on islands and seaside
  1. Compare a region of the UK with a region in Europe e.g. local hilly area; under sea level
  2. Link with Science: rocks
  1. Understand geographical similarities and differences through the study of human and physical geography of a region in the United Kingdom; a region in a European Country and a region within North or South America
  1. Compare a region in UK with a region in North or South America with significant differences and similarities e.g. link to Fairtrade of bananas in St Lucia
  1. Compare a region in UK with a region in North or South America with significant differences and similarities e.g. link to Fairtrade of bananas in St Lucia
  2. Understand the reasons for similarities and differences

 

Years 1 and 2

Years 3 and 4

Years 5 and 6

Human and Physical Knowledge

  • Pupils should be taught to:
  1. identify seasonal and daily weather patterns in the United Kingdom and the location of hot and cold areas of the world in relation to the Equator and the North and South Poles
  2. use basic geographical vocabulary to refer to:
    • key physical features, including: beach, cliff, coast, forest, hill, mountain, sea, ocean, river, soil, valley, vegetation, season and weather
    • key human features, inc. city, town, village, factory, farm, house, office, port, harbour, shop
  • Pupils should be taught to:
  1. describe and understand key aspects of:
    • physical geography, including: climate zones, biomes and vegetation belts, rivers, mountains, volcanoes and earthquakes, and the water cycle
    • human geography, including: types of settlement and land use, economic activity including trade links, and the distribution of natural resources including energy, food, minerals and water

 

Year 1

Year 2

Year 3

Year 4

Year 5

Year 6

 

  1. Identify seasonal and daily weather patterns in the United Kingdom
  2. Identify the location of hot and cold areas of the world in relation to the Equator and the North and South Poles
  3. Use basic geographical vocabulary to refer to key physical features (forest, hill, mountain, soil, valley, vegetation)
  4. Key human features (city, town, village, factory, farm, house, office

Use basic geographical vocabulary to refer to

  1. key physical features including: beach, cliff, coast, forest, hill, mountain, sea, ocean, river, soil, valley, vegetation, season and weather
  2. Key human features including city, town, village, factory, farm, house, office, port, harbour, shop
  1. Describe and understand key aspects of: Physical geography including rivers and the water cycle (excluding transpiration) brief introduction to volcanoes and earth quakes linking to Science: rock types
  2. Human geography including trade links in the pre-Roman and Roman era
  3. Types of settlements in Early Britain linked to History.  Why did early people choose to settle there?
  1. Describe and understand key aspects of physical geography including climate zones, biomes and vegetation belts
  2. Types of settlement in modern Britain: villages, towns, cities

 

  1. Describe and understand key aspect of physical geography including coasts, rivers and the water cycle including transpiration, climate zones, biomes and vegetation belts
  2. Human geography including trade between UK and Europe
  3. Fair/unfair distribution of resources (Fairtrade)
  4. Types of settlements linked to History
  1. Describe and understand key aspects of physical geography including volcanoes and earthquakes, looking at plate tectonics and the ring of fire
  2. Distribution of natural resources focussing on energy (link with coal mining past History and eco power in D&T)
  • St Joseph’s Roman Catholic Primary School,
  • Wallsend Road, North Shields,
  • Tyne and Wear, NE29 7BT
  • 0191 2573097
  • 0191 2005851
  • info@stjosephsrc-primary.co.uk
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